HOW TO FIND YOUR ANCESTORS BEFORE 1790

Thursday, October 11, 2018

Clues to Finding More Ancestors

Clues to Finding More Ancestors

sandbars at St. SimonsOne needs to really dig into old boring records to piece together the genealogy puzzle. The Colonial Records of Georgia denotes an vessel from London wrecking on a sandbar near St. Simon's Island about 1740. This ship sank and all its passengers were lost, including the infamous magistrate, Thomas Causton, who had traveled to London to clear his good name of charges brought against him for the mishandling of estates. Causton had arrived in February of 1733 along with General Oglethorpe, the first shipload of passengers to settle Georgia. For obvious reasons, it is impossible to find the names of all passengers who attempted to cross the seas. John Wesley kept a diary of his tenure in Georgia. It is full of interesting details about the early settlers, but also provides names of the settlers and his notations concerning baptisms, marriages and deaths. German immigrants and their origins as well as biographies of the first settlers to Georgia is available to members of Georgia Pioneers



Index to Georgia Wills-See Names of your Ancestors

Online Genealogy

Saturday, October 6, 2018

Need Free Help on your Genealogy?

Now may be the time for you to join Georgia Pioneers!  More genealogy database has been added to Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia - all accessibl with the same password under "Georgia Pioneers".  The largest addition by far is the Genealogy Vault which includes 3000+ traced families and Special Collections!

An extra available service to members (expires soon) is that I will personally research (FREE) the ancestor which whom you are experiencing the most problems and afterwards share it on the website to that others working on the same lineage may contact you and/or share their information.  To take advantage, join below.




Index to Georgia Wills-See Names of your Ancestors

Online Genealogy

Thursday, October 4, 2018

The Thrifty Baby-Boomer Generation #georgiapioneerscom #gagenealogy

The Thrifty Baby-Boomer Generation (1940s-1960)

1940s school dressThis generation collected and saved the old family bible and other treasures past. They were the children raised during the Second World War, Korea and Vietnam. They knew relatives who served in WW I and WW II, part of the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression of the 1930s. It was an era which specialized in hard work, bravery and ambition to make it better for their children. The pay scale was something like $15 per week and people appreciated having a job. Children were taught to tell the truth, play in the yard, participate in sports, pray in school and to salute the American Flag. They attended school in clean, well-pressed clothes. The girls wore ballerina skirts and bobbie-socks. During the summer, children sold coat hangers for 1 cent each to local dry cleaners. There were no riots or demonstrations in the parks and streets. People raked their yards and picked up their own trash. A college education was not required to obtain a job. Although salaries were low, food was rationed and the imposition of income tax by the democrat Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1935 was a burden, people were thrifty and managed to live within their income. Yet despite the struggles of this era, families were free of debt and it was simplier times.



Index to Georgia Wills-See Names of your Ancestors

Online Genealogy