HOW TO FIND YOUR ANCESTORS BEFORE 1790

Friday, March 22, 2019

Fulton County GA Wills, Estates etc. See Names #genealogy #georgiapioneerscom

Fulton County Wills, Estates, Marriages, Tax Digests, Churches, Births

Fulton was created in 1853. In 1857 Milton County (now now Fulton County) included parts of Cherokee, Forsyth and Cobb Counties. Milton was named for John Milton, Georgia's first Secretary of State and was located North of the Chattahoochee River (now Fulton County). Fulton was named for Robert Fulton, the famous inventor who experimented with a submarine boat in 1801 in France and built the Clermont, a steamboat which sailed up the Hudson River in 1807. During the Revolutionary War, Milton traveled to Charleston, South Carolina, and New Bern, North Carolina before moving to Maryland with the official records of the state while Georgia was occupied by the English. Campbell and Milton County merged with Fulton on January 1, 1932. At this time Roswell was ceded from Cobb County. 

Early settlers: Laughlin Arendall, Stephen Aldredge, Washington Archer, Aaron Alexander, George H. Brown, Michael Bloomfield, William L. Baldwin, F. N. Chisholm, James Campbell, Meredith Collier, Frederick Deckner, Reuben Dunning, Jerry Freeman, James Franklin, William Gray, Solomon Hopkins, William Hill, Willis Johnson, Benjamin Johnson, Thomas Kennedy, Benjamin King, Alexander Luckie, Aaron Merriam, Aaron Nunnally, Basil Overby, Poole, Ephraim, Joseph Robinson, Welcome Sparks, James Turner, William Underwood and Samuel Walker.

Also, see Campbell and Milton County Records, which counties were once part of Fulton. Fulton County records begin in 1854. Fulton County's First Rural Mail Delivery

Fulton County Court House Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Wills

    Fulton County Wills 1854-1882 (abstracts)

Online Images of Fulton County Wills 1854 to 1866

Testators:Abbott, Albert; Bemelmaus, Henry; Braden, Joseph; Carter, Rhonda; Charpentier, Alexander; Clark, Jesse; Coleman, Frances; Collins, Merideth; Combs, Mary; Connally, Christopher; Dennis, Joseph H. ;Donehoo, James; Fair, Elizabeth; Franklin, James; Gideon, Francis; Haggard, Green; Hargraves, Mary Ann . . . more names . . .


Online Genealogy

Friday, March 15, 2019

Images of Franklin Co. GA Wills, Estates #genealogy #georgiapioneerscom

Images of Franklin County Wills and Estates

Carnesville, GeorgiaFranklin was created in 1784 and named for Benjamin Franklin. The original territory was ceded by the Cherokees in the Treaty of Long Swamp in 1782 and by the Creeks at the Treaty of Augusta in 1783. At that time it included all of Barrow and Jackson Counties and portions of Oconee, Clarke, Madison,Banks, Hart, Stephens, Gwinnett, Hall and Habersham counties, as well as the northwestern corner of South Carolina (present-day Pickens, Oconee and Anderson counties). Researchers should also research these South Carolina counties where many of the first residents of Franklin were located. The court house was constructed in 1788.This land was among the last land in Georgia to be distributed under the headright system. In 1789 the headright system passed from state to county government, and the state began to grant hugh tracts of land to speculators. These policies ended with the Pine Barrens Scandal and the Yazoo Land Fraud. of 1795-1796. In 1803, the headright system was replaced by the 1803 land lottery. County business was conducted in the home of Warren Philpot in (Sweet) Gum Log on the Tugaloo. George Walton, signer of the Declaration of Independence, was the first chief justice. In 1788 a courthouse was approved by the state legislature but was not built until 1794. It was constructed on the old John Mullins' Ford on the Tugaloo River. Later, in 1806 a courthouse was completed in downtown Carnesville. Franklin Springs was a popular stop with early visitors and by 1800 a fledgling tourist industry of sorts began to develop, although the land was still remote. A popular tavern and resort was Traveller's Rest. When Carnesville was established in 1811 and became the county seat, another court house was built there in 1826, adjacent to the old one. This building was torn down to make way for a new court house in 1906. No wills or estates exist for this county at the Franklin County Court House prior to 1899. The early wills and deeds are probably located at the local historical society in Carnesville.

Franklin County Records Available to Members of Georgia Pioneers

Indexes to Franklin County Probate Records
  • Index to Franklin County Wills, Appraisements, Inventories (partial) 1786-1813.
  • Index to Franklin County Wills 1848-1865.
  • Index to Franklin County Wills, Inventories, Guardians 1814-1829.
  • Index to Franklin County Inferior Court Petitions 1799-1805

Online Images of Franklin County Wills, Appraisements, Inventories 1786-1813

Names of Testators: Barrett, Ninean | Baugh, David | Baugh, David | Berry, Andrew | Berry, Andrew | Berry, A. | Berry, Armsted | Bobo, Lewis | Bowen, Jonathan | Bratcher, Amos | Brewer, Ann | Brown, Augustus | Brown, Hugh | Burk, John | Bush, Daniel | Carlton, Jacob | Carlton, Jacob | Chandler, Shadrick | Christian, Elijah | Christian, Elijah | Christian, John | Christian, John | Christian, John | Christian, Rufus | Christian, William | Clark, David | Clayton, Charles | Cleveland, J. | Cleveland, John | Cleveland, John | Cleveland, John | Conn, John | Connally, John | Cooper, Cornelius | Davis, Richard | Davis, Richard | Dorsey, Basil | Dyer, Martin |  . . . more names . . .

Online Genealogy

Thursday, March 14, 2019

1918 Anderson Six


1918 Anderson Six
Did you know that about the “Anderson Six” automobile? It was advertised and sold in Atlanta during 1918. Do you imagine yourself taking one of the first rides? There are so many interesting stories to learn about our ancestors. Just as we seem to speed quickly along the avenue of life, embracing new ideas and transitioning through new technology, our ancestors also had a grip on the changing fads. 1916 was the last days of Queen Elizabeth’s staunch Victorian Era, and our relatives stepped up for the changes. You don’t really think that your ancestors were boring old trolls who did little to bring out changes, do you? When tracing, it is always a good idea to read the newspapers of their times and see what was happening. Also, 8 Genealogy Websites features genealogy databases in 7 States! Why not check it out?


Online Genealogy